Digital Distribution

Droid Does Miracast, What’s That?

This week Verizon and Motorola introduced their new family of Droid phones – the Mini, Ultra, and Maxx. This generation of Droid phones includes the kind of spec upgrades expected in a high-end smartphones. For the most part, all phones in the series have the same hardware such as 2GB of RAM and a 10 mega-pixel camera. Notably different, though, is the 4.3-inch screen in the Mini, the thin form factor of the Ultra (which excludes the wireless charging to reduce the thickness), and the mammoth 3,500 mAh, 48-hour battery in the Maxx.

Netflix in the “House,” Especially Among Tablet Users

In-line with the company’s “data-held-closely-to-the-vest” culture, Netflix did not offer much visibility into smartphone and tablet usage during its first quarter earnings call. However, we know that Netflix usage, particularly on tablet platforms, is significant and growing. Netflix is not only far and away the most popular subscription video app, and second only to YouTube, it also leads in overall in engagement (time spent) on tablets, with usage approaching nearly one-third of total video-viewing time during the month of March, according to Connected Intelligence’s SmartMeter...

Dish Bids for Sprint: Shotgun wedding made in heaven?

Dish shook up the wireless market today with an offer to buy Sprint, arguing that the deal it has put on the table is worth 13% more than the current Softbank offer. But beyond the size of the deal, Dish has a compelling argument in terms of the synergies of both companies. Dish has spectrum waiting to be used – something that Sprint could clearly benefit from – as well as a large customer base in the U.S. market. By contrast, as we noted when Softbank made its initial bid for Sprint, there are fewer obvious benefits of a Sprint/Softbank deal. But more importantly, this is the first case of a Pay TV operator buying into mobile telecom, rather than a telecom company moving into Pay TV, a case of “man bites dog” compared to the more usual outcome.

425 Million Connected Devices – So, What Are Consumers Doing With Them?

We can now watch HBOGO on three TVs in our home. Last night we saw they started promoting its availability on Airplay. As an early adopter, my first thought was, I want an Apple TV too. But there is no need as all three TVs we own provide HBOGO, and each through a different type of device. Apple TV does, however, offer screen mirroring which none of the other connected devices in our homeprovide, and that is bound to be useful – right?

While Super Bowl XLVII Sunday Night Lights Go Out (For A Bit), Select Second-Screen (Smartphone) Activities Light-Up

While I never thought I’d ask “why did the power go out?” during the Super Bowl, I did have a number of questions going into the Big Game, including: 1) Which Brother Harbaugh will prevail? 2) Will Beyoncé redeem herself from “lip-sync-gate”? 3) How will consumers’ use their smartphones (companion, second screen) on Game Day? Well: These were the big questions that I was pondering, and for which I now have answers for: 1) John Harbaugh, 2) Yes, and 3) smartphone users kept their eyes affixed to the Big Screen, and periodically leveraged the immediacy and utility of their second-screens.

Another Home Screen For Your Home

The TV is evolving into a more complex device and the basic concept on turning it on and immediately watching TV could become a thing of the past. As consumers we’ve become conditioned to expect home screens on computers, tablets, and smartphones; TVs now look set to follow suit. New TVs from Samsung and Panasonic launch to a home screen rather than the last TV channel you were watching. This home, or launch page, is a customized experience based on recognition from a built-in camera.

Internet Connected TVs Are Used To Watch TV, And That’s About All

The Internet connected HDTV screen has so far failed to break beyond the bounds of its TV-centric heritage, with little use for the big screen beyond the obligatory video services. But the connection is being used to provide access to a far wider variety of alternative sources for video content. The latest NPD Connected Intelligence Application & Convergence report highlights that nearly six out of ten consumers who own a connected HDTV are accessing Over-the-Top (OTT) video services through the device.

Newsweek Moves to Digital Only

In 1995, The Economist Newspaper Group launched the world’s first web-only publication, a hi-tech-focused magazine called d.Comm. The magazine basked in a short-term glow of being an innovator, blazing a futuristic trail, and then closed its doors due to a lack of advertising. 17 years later, does Newsweek’s bold step to go all-digital stand any better chance of success?

Google Fiber: Could It Be More Disruptive?

Google Fiber officially debuted last week in the Kansas City area after a long testing phase as the Internet giant has begun taking pre-registrations. In essence, Google is taking telco and cable companies head on with a value proposition to build a super fast (allegedly 100 times faster than any other U.S. ISP’s average broadband speeds) fiber infrastructure in return for a $300 installation fee, which can be paid at once or in $25 installments, per household. Google then complements the fiber solution with three service package options.

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