Mobility

A Marriage Made in Spectrum Heaven

T-Mobile USA and MetroPCS are getting married. The deal, announced today, will result in a merged entity – to be called T-Mobile – that has 42 million subscribers and a far stronger overall spectrum holding. The new T-Mobile will still be the fourth largest U.S. carrier (Sprint is third with 56+ million subscribers) but the other benefits of this deal are more significant.

Is The Next Killer App A Wire? – The Apple Lightning Connector

Does what came first really matter? Apple touted the need to replace its 10+ year old 1-inch plug because this dated technology is too big for the sleek new iPhone 5. It’s clear that the old 30 pin plug could use updating, but what really drove the change to happen now? Was it the need to reinvigorate the lucrative “i” accessories market or did the change in iPhone form factor truly drive the need? What is certain is that the change will have a resounding impact on the Apple accessory market over the coming years.

Motorola Joins the Launch Season with More Droid

Motorola went BIG and small with the launch of the new RAZR HD, RAZR Maxx HD, and RAZR M on September 5. The big question is; will it be enough for them to grow their share among the market leading Verizon Wireless subscriber base with the iPhone 5 rumored for release this month? While the initial Droid RAZR sold fairly well, Motorola is looking to re-capture the hay-day of the 2009 DROID launch.

Lumia Shines, If Only For the Day

As expected, today Nokia launched the next generation Lumia device, with an upgrade to Windows Phone 8. Two new devices were launched, the Lumia 820 and 920; both logical step-ups from the existing 800 and 900 that are on the market today and with relatively similar form factors. But to simply consider these devices to be “upgrades” is to miss the point of the new devices. Both support significant new innovations, including wireless charging, vastly improved camera and superior displays.

Nokia Hopes To Make A “Hit” With Its Free Streaming Music Service In The U.S. Market

Following on the heels of Samsung’s Music Hub premium streaming service launch last month, Nokia announced on Tuesday that it is bringing its “Nokia Music” free streaming music service to the U.S. Unveiled nearly a year ago at the “Nokia World” event and in conjunction with the Lumia 710 and Lumia 800 device launches, Nokia Music’s U.S.

Samsung Looks To Strike A Chord In Streaming Music

Last week Samsung launched its Music Hub streaming service in the U.S., limited initially to select Samsung Galaxy S III devices. Music Hub premium version ($9.99 monthly) includes: upload of owned music library and storage up to 100 GB with Scan & Match Cloud Locker; storefront and streaming access to 19+ million tracks (assets from mSpot acquisition partner 7digital); personalized/custom radio; and recommendation engine capabilities.

Sharing Is A Good, But Complicated Thing

AT&T has joined Verizon Wireless in offering a shared data plan option for its customers. Not surprisingly, the plan is similar in nature, based on the premise that the voice and messaging minutes should be unlimited, while the data component is offered in various buckets (1GB for $40 scaling up to 20 GB for $200). But are these plans simplifying the purchase experience or further complicating it?

I Lost My Shorts, But Not My Data

I lost my shorts on Friday (I should mention that I wasn’t wearing them at the time). The loss of shorts, while annoying, was nothing more than a minor inconvenience. But Friday 13th had more in store: in my shorts were my wallet and my smartphone (I still wasn’t wearing them!). Whoops. Frantic calls to my phone took me to voicemail, suggesting that either the phone had been switched off or was crushed, and so I began “the process.”

Cords Are For Cutting

The success of the mobile phone market over the past 10 to 15 years came at the clear expense of the landline market. The insipient creep of cord-cutting behavior coupled with the younger generation that never saw the point of having a cord, has resulted in lower landline numbers and pretty much a universal agreement that the landline will fade, if not to obscurity then at least to a dusty corner of the living room.

Windows 8 Tablet Differentiation Starts to Surface

Microsoft’s Surface announcement packed a one-two punch. Of course, the big surprise was that Microsoft would compete with its OEM partners in its central revenue source of Windows–licensed devices. But it also seemed clear that the Surface introduction brought to the fore many aspects of Windows 8 and RT that are not germane to Surface, such as the idea that a device could be considered a tablet and a PC (the main rationale of Windows 8’s design).

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